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20100901
20100930
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
they mean for the president's plans to boost the economy. >> lehrer: then jeffrey brown talks to tom bearden in chile about rescuing those 33 miners, trapped now for over a month. >> they seem for the most part, those we talked to, in pretty good spirits until you talk to them for a while and then you find out there's a great deal of anxiety and a great deal of concerns for their loved ones. >> ifill: we examine the firestorm surrounding a plan to burn the koran at a church in florida, as general david petraeus warns it could incite violence against american troops. >> lehrer: judy woodruff looks at the web site craigslist and the changes in its adult service's section. >> ifill: and we have an encore profile of one of the most renowned figures in modern dance, judith jamison, who was honored with a tribute at the white house today. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and b
's proposals to jump start the economic recovery and create new jobs. >> lehrer: then, tom bearden reports from chile on the trapped miners and their relatives above-ground. >> it's been a long and lonely vigle for the families of the miners trapped underground, and there's no end in sight. >> ifill: judy woodruff talks to stephen mufson of the washington post about a b.p. internal report, which blames the largest offshore oil spill in history on a series of human and mechanical failures. >> lehrer: and, global post reporter solana pyne looks at dhaka, bangladesh-- the fastest growing of the world's mega- cities and one of the poorest. >> i think if you simply project the present into the future, then we are headed no good place. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: this is the engine that connects zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and e
of the week's news. >> woodruff: and tom bearden, in morgan city, louisiana, looks at how even the b.p. oil spill couldn't stop the 75th annual shrimp and petroleum festival. despite a lot of concerns about the future, this town is ready to party. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the august jobs report turned out a mixed bag of results today. there were slight improvements in the private sector, but they were not enough to reduce overall unemployment. ray suarez has our story. >> suarez: more people found work in construction as the summer closed, and in hospitals and other health care work. in all, private employers added 67,000 jobs, a modest gain, but better than expected. at the same time, the public sector shed 121,000 positions, most of them temporary census jobs. the bottom line
. >> woodruff: tom bearden reports from louisiana on the state's growing battle against coastal erosion, in the wake of the b.p. oil spill. >> large chunks of louisiana's coastal wetlands are literally dissolving and so are some of the nation's best fishing ground. >> ifill: plus, we hear from former white house economic advisor glenn hubbard, in the first of several conversations on whether to extend the bush- era tax cuts. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to author gary shteyngart about his new novel set in a not so far off america-- "super, sad, true love story." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institution
is mounting over safety conditions at the mine. newshour correspondent tom bearden reports from the scene. >> reporter: this person has been a miner all his life. he works out of a cluster of tumble-down buildings on the side of a mountain in the atacama desert about 35 miles from the site where the miners are trapped. this is arguably the driest place on earth. both nasa and hollywood have used the terrain to simulate the planet mars. as a younger man he worked for some of the big mining companies but he decided he wanted to be his own boss. so 30 years ago he started working this gold mine by himself. he sets the explosives and even hauls the ore out of the tunnel on his back, 150 pounds at a time. he says he's not surprised about what happened in the san jose mine. he says nobody really cares about the miners. not the owners, not the government. >> the only thing the owners are interested in is production, production. keep coming with more minerals. the human part doesn't matter. if it was just three or four miners stuck below, nobody would care. because it's 33 they can't hide that. t
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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